Kronberg, Julius, Swedish painter (1850-1921). Autograph quotation signed.Lilla Skuggan, 21 Aug 1917.

Inscribed to the German dermatologist Alwin Scharlau: "Mad nöje tillmötesgar jag Eder anhaltan och sänder härmed det önskade autogrammet [...]".

Admitted to the Stockholm Academy at the early age of 14, Kronberg specialized in mythological and religious themes, drawing on the works of Shakespeare as well as the Bible, and created canvases and ceiling frescoes for the Stockholm Palace or the Kronberg Royal Dramatic Theatre.

Postmarks on verso showing through; traces of a vertical fold. Self-addressed by the collector on the reverse. The Mecklenburg physician Scharlau (b. 1888) assembled a collection of artists' autographs by personal application.

Schinnerer, Adolf, German painter, graphic artist and draftsman (1876-1949). Autograph quotation signed.Munich, 23 Nov 1921.

Inscribed to the German dermatologist Alwin Scharlau: "Es gibt nichts Unwichtiges mehr, Alles wird gesammelt, es ist eine Lust zu leben! [...]".

Co-founder of the "Neue Secession" in Munich in 1913, and the owner of a manor in the artists' colony at Haimhausen near Munich since 1918, Schinnerer mainly created landscapes as well as figural compositions, mastered the drypoint technique, and was a successful illustrator of books, including a 1921 edition of Shakespeare's "The Tempest".

Traces of a postal stamp. Self-addressed by the collector on the reverse. The Mecklenburg physician Scharlau (b. 1888) assembled a collection of artists' autographs by personal application.

Grützner, Eduard von, German genre painter (1846-1925). Autograph signature.Munich, postmark: 29 May 1908.

Inscribed to the German dermatologist Alwin Scharlau.

One of Munich's leading genre painters in the second half of the 19th century and an avid art collector, Grützner specialized in painting scenes of monastic life which earned him the byname "Mönchmaler", and repeatedly portrayed the Shakespeare character Sir John Falstaff.

Traces of a postmark. Self-addressed by the collector on the reverse. The Mecklenburg physician Scharlau (b. 1888) assembled a collection of artists' autographs by personal application.

Ionesco, Eugène, Romanian-French playwright (1912-1994). "Qu'est-ce que l'avant garde en 1958". Autograph manuscript signed.N. p., 1958.

Important text about artistic creation and the avant-garde, published in "Les Lettres françaises" of 17 April 1958 as part of the survey: "What is the avant-garde in 1958?". In Ionesco's view, art must strive to express realities that are "new and ancient, present and inopportune, living and permanent, particular, and, at the same time, universal". A label like "the avant-garde" is a mere afterthought to this goal: "To want to be part of the avant-garde before writing, not to want to be part of it, to refuse or choose an avant-garde is, for a creator, to construe things the wrong way round". For Ionesco the avant-garde is "only the current, historical expression of an inactual actuality (if I may say so), of a trans-historical reality". Therefore he is very sceptical of political art, as the work of art "is nothing if it does not transcend the temporary truths or obsessions of history". Several artists, historical and biblical figures are mentioned as examples of the "profound universalism" Ionesco is arguing for, including Buddha, Shakespeare, the Spanish mystic Juan de la Cruz, Proust, Chekhov, Brecht, and Picasso. In his own work, Ionesco tries "to say how the world appears to me, what it seems to be for me, as sincerely as possible without concern for propaganda, without intention of directing the consciences of contempraries. I try to be an objective witness in my subjectivity". The essence of his theatre is the contradictory, the absurd: "Since I write for the theatre, I am only concerned with personifying, embodying a comic and tragic sense of reality at the same time." Ionesco describes a childhood memory of a senseless act of violence which first invoked the feelings of vertigo, anguish, and transience that he tries to convey in his art: "I have no other images of the world apart from those, expressing the ephemerality and the harshness, the vanity and the anger, the nullity or hideous, useless hatred. This is how existence continued to appear to me". In closing, he aims to reconcile avant-garde and "living tradition", past and present: "One has the impression, also, that the more one is of one's time, the more one is of all times (if one breaks the crust of superficial topicality) [...] The youngest, newest works of art are recognizable and speak to all eras. Yes, King Solomon is my leader; and Job, this contemporary of Beckett".

With a stricken-out title "Avant-garde et tradition", corrections, and typograph marks. The first three pages with a tear minimally affecting the text. Some black fingerstains and stains, minor tears, and browning.

Shakespeare, William. Iti'el ha-kushi mi-Vine'tsya 'al pi Sheksper. Othello the Moor of Venice …Vienna, 1874 / 634.

First Hebrew edition: the first translation of any of Shakespeare's plays into the Hebrew language. Perez ben Moses Smolenskin (1842-85), the editor, writes in the the introduction: "Shakespeare’s plays in the Holy Tongue! … what a great prize the translator of these plays has brought into the treasure-house of our language." Smolenskin, born in present-day Ukraine, enjoyed a traditional education, studied languages and eventually settled in Vienna, where he founded the journal "Haschachar" ("The Dawn") in 1868, a trailblazing publication for Hebrew literature and language, as well as for the Jewish national idea.

"The first Hebrew Shakespeare translations are a product of the Haskalah, or Jewish Enlightenment. [...] Maskilim, adherents of the Haskalah, sought to promote greater integration of Jews into their European host societies with a view towards eventual emancipation. [...] A central element of the Maskilic project was the creation of a modern literary culture in Hebrew including genres that had not previously existed among Ashkenazic Jewry" (Kahn, p. 1). As early as 1816, Salomo Löwisohn offered 15 lines from "Henry IV, Part 2", and between the 1840s and the 1870 a half-dozen fragments (mainly monologues) from "Hamlet" and other plays were translated into Hebrew, all via German. "This early period of marginal Hebrew Shakespeare translation ended with the publication of I. E. Salkinson's Hebrew translation of Othello, 'Ithiel the Cushite of Venice' (Vienna, 1874). Salkinson's 'Ithiel' marked the beginning of a new era in the story of Shakespeare in Hebrew because it was the first rendition of a complete play to appear in the language and the first to gain widespread critical attention in Maskilic literary circles. In addition, it was the first Hebrew Shakespeare version to be translated directly from the English original" (Kahn, p. 3).

The talented linguist Isaac Edward Salkinson (1822-83), a native of Vilna, settled in Vienna, having converted to Protestantism in London and served as a Presbyterian priest in Glasgow. He also translated "Romeo and Juliet" as well as Milton's "Paradise Lost".

Includes both the Hebrew and English title. Very brittle with a few edge flaws, but complete; English title professionally remargined. Very rare; a single copy in Vienna (Jüdisches Museum Wien).

Voltaire, François-Marie Arouet, (1694-1775). Autograph letter signed "V" to the avocate and poet Bernard Joseph Saurin …N. p., 28 Feb 1764.

The newest tragedy by Saurin, "Blanche et Guiscard, tragédie imitée de l'anglais de Tancred and Sigismunda de Thomson", gives Voltaire a reason to repeat his aversion to Shakespeare and English theatre: "Vous avez fait, monsieur, bien de l'honneur à ce Tomson. Je l'ai connu il y a quelque quarante années. S'il avait scu être un peu plus interessant dans ses autres pièces, et moins déclamateur, il aurait transformé le théâtre anglais, que Gilles Shakespear a fait naître et à gâté, mais ce Gilles Shakespear avec toute la barbarie et son ridicule, a comme Lopez de Véga des trais si naïfs et si vrais, et un fracas d'actions si imposant, que tous les raisonnements de Pierre Corneille sont à la glace en comparaison du tragique de ce Gilles [...] Les anglais on un autre avantage sur nous, c'est de se passer de la rime. Le mérite de nos grands poëtes est souvent dans la difficulté de la rime surmontée et le mérite des poëtes anglais est souvent dans l'expression de la nature [...] Vous savez il n'y a pas un mot de vrai dans l'histoire de Sigismunda et Guiscardo, mais je vous sais bon gré d'avoir donné des louanges à ce Mainfroid dont les papes [biffé et réécrit] ont dit tant de mal [...] Un temps viendra où la St Barthelémi sera un sujet de tragédie [...]".

Voltaire. Correspondance. Édition Theodore Besterman. Vol. VII. Paris: Gallimard, 1981, lettre 8186, pp. 589-590.

Bormann, Edwin, Schriftsteller und Verlagsbuchhändler (1851-1912). Eigenh. Albumblatt mit U.Leipzig, 13 Dec 1905.

"Es giebt so manchen auf der Welt, | Dem meine Weise nicht gefällt. | So auch der Floh, das muntre Tier, | Es fand noch nie Geschmack an mir. | Da naht ein Wiener Exemplar | Und bringt mir seine Grüße dar - | Wie neugeboren bin ich jetzt, | Da der berühmtste 'Floh' mich schätzt".

Edwin Bormann gründete 1888 für die Publikation seiner Werke einen eigenen Verlag und rief 1909 gemeinsam mit Georg Bötticher und Arthur von Oettingen die Künstlervereinigung Leoniden ins Leben. "Bormann trat vor allem als sächsischer Mundartdichter hervor. Daneben verfaßte er Gedichtkollagen wie seine 'Schilleressenz', in denen er nach Art des Cento Zitate zu einem neuen Text montierte. Der Titel seines Buchs 'Jedes Thierchen hat sein Pläsierchen' ging in den deutschen Zitatenschatz ein. In mehreren Publikationen trat er außerdem für die sogenannte Shakespeare-Bacontheorie ein, die Francis Bacon für den Verfasser der unter dem Namen des Schauspielers William Shakespeare veröffentlichten Werke hält. Im Gegensatz zu anderen Vertretern der Theorie versuchte er - nach eigenem Bekunden - den Nachweis zu erbringen, indem er einen 'unauflöslichen Zusammenhang’ zwischen den Shakespeare-Dichtungen und den naturwissenschaftlich-philosophischen Werken Bacons aufzeigte. So sei der 'Sturm' eine Parabel zu Bacons Naturphilosophie, 'Lear' zur Ökonomie und 'Hamlet' zur Anthropologie“ (Wikipedia).

Bormann, Edwin, Schriftsteller und Verlagsbuchhändler (1851-1912). Eigenh. Brief mit U. und eh. Albumblatt mit U.Leipzig, 8 Nov 1883.

An Alfred Grenser in Wien zur Übersendung des Albumblattes mit einer Abschrift seines Gedichtes "Hans Makart's 'Bacchanden Familiche'. Gunst-Sonett ännes alden Leibz'gersch": "[...] Das Gedichtchen ist meiner soeben bei Braun & Schneider in München erschienenen Sammlung 'Leipziger Allerlei' entnommen und knüpft an ein bekanntes Bild Ihres berühmten Wiener Mitbürgers an. Aber ich hoffe, daß werde von Ihnen noch von Makart selbst (falls ihm das Sonett je vor Augen kommt) die kleine Neckerei mißverstanden wird [...]".

Edwin Bormann gründete 1888 für die Publikation seiner Werke einen eigenen Verlag und rief 1909 gemeinsam mit Georg Bötticher und Arthur von Oettingen die Künstlervereinigung Leoniden ins Leben. "Bormann trat vor allem als sächsischer Mundartdichter hervor. Daneben verfaßte er Gedichtkollagen wie seine 'Schilleressenz', in denen er nach Art des Cento Zitate zu einem neuen Text montierte. Der Titel seines Buchs 'Jedes Thierchen hat sein Pläsierchen' ging in den deutschen Zitatenschatz ein. In mehreren Publikationen trat er außerdem für die sogenannte Shakespeare-Bacontheorie ein, die Francis Bacon für den Verfasser der unter dem Namen des Schauspielers William Shakespeare veröffentlichten Werke hält. Im Gegensatz zu anderen Vertretern der Theorie versuchte er - nach eigenem Bekunden - den Nachweis zu erbringen, indem er einen ‚unauflöslichen Zusammenhang’ zwischen den Shakespeare-Dichtungen und den naturwissenschaftlich-philosophischen Werken Bacons aufzeigte. So sei der 'Sturm' eine Parabel zu Bacons Naturphilosophie, 'Lear' zur Ökonomie und 'Hamlet' zur Anthropologie“ (Wikipedia).

Jeweils auf Briefpapier mit gedr. Briefkopf.

Delius, Nikolaus, Anglist (1813-1888). Eigenh. Stundenverzeichnis mit U.Bonn, o. D.

Affiche mit der Ankündigung dreier Veranstaltungen: "Im bevorstehenden Sommersemester denke ich folgende Vorlesungen zu halten: publice über Shakespear's King Lear [...]".

Der Bonner Universitätsprofessor ist besonders für seine 1854-60 veröffentlichte Shakespeare-Ausgabe bekannt. Der Lehrstuhl für Anglistik, den er erhalten sollte, war der erste in Deutschland.

Mit vier Nadellöchern von der ursprünglichen Affichierung.

Giraldi, Giovanni Battista. Hecatommithi, overo Cento Novelle di M. Giovanbattista Giraldi Cinthio …Venedig, 1579-1580.

Noch frühe Ausgabe von Giraldis bekanntestem Werk (EA 1565), einer Novellensammlung im Stile Boccaccios und Bandellos, das u. a. Shakespeare die Stoffe für "Maß für Maß" und "Othello" lieferte. Der Literat, Dramatiker, Philosoph und Mediziner Giovanni Battista Giraldi (1504-73) aus Ferrara ist unter dem Namen "Cinzio" bekannt.

Etwas gebräunt bzw. braunfleckig; der zweite Teil stärker wasserrandig. Gelenke angeplatzt.

Trenck, Siegfried von der, Schriftsteller (1882-1951). Ms. Postkarte mit eigenh. Paraphe.Berlin, 2 Dec 1947.

Dankt Josef Wesely für ihm übersandte Wünsche zum Geburtstag: “Ich habe inzwischen einen ‘Goethe’, ‘Paulus’, Luther’, ‘Katechismus’, 3 Bände ‘Mysterium Christi’, ‘Shakespeare’, ‘Faust’ geschrieben. Aber wann wird es je gedruckt werden? [...]” - Gar nicht; Trenck, der während des Dritten Reichs Mitglied des nationalsozialistischen Rechtswahrerbundes war, sollte nach 1945 bis zu seinem Tod nicht mehr publizistisch hervortreten. Vgl. Kosch IV, 3044 und BBKL XII, s. v.